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Duncan Lorne Martin (1916-1919)

Duncan Lorne MartinLeeftijd: 49 jaar18901940

Naam
Duncan Lorne Martin
Voornamen
Duncan Lorne
Achternaam
Martin
Geboren 11 september 1890 32 26
Geboorte van een broerGordon A. Martin
17 maart 1893 (Leeftijd 2 jaar)
Geboorte van een broerRoss W. Martin
1896 (Leeftijd 5 jaar)

Woonplaats 1911 (Leeftijd 20 jaar)
Tekst:

Bron: 1911 Census of Canada Simcoe South Sub-District 17

Woonplaats vanaf 1910 tot 1912 (Leeftijd 19 jaar)
Historisch Feit
RMS Titanic gezonken
14 april 1912 (Leeftijd 21 jaar)
Notitie: De RMS Titanic was het tweede van een drietal luxeschepen uit de Olympic-klasse, die een groot deel van het trans-Atlantisch verkeer moesten verwerken. Het schip was eigendom van de rederij White Star Line, en werd gebouwd in Belfast. In de nacht van 14 op 15 april 1912 kwam de Titanic op zijn eerste reis kort voor middernacht in aanvaring met een ijsberg; een deel van de stuurboordzijde werd op verscheidene plaatsen doorboord, en binnen drie uur was het schip gezonken. 1522 opvarenden kwamen om het leven.
Beroep
Onderwijzer (School Teacher)
15 januari 1916 (Leeftijd 25 jaar)

Woonplaats 15 januari 1916 (Leeftijd 25 jaar)
Krijgsmacht
1st Depot Battalion Alberta Regiment
vanaf 16 januari 1916 tot juni 1916 (Leeftijd 25 jaar)

Instantie: Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF)
Tekst:

Regiment Number: 3206000 Unit: M.D. 13 Company No: 4 Class: I Military Service Act letter and number: 352262 MC. Rank: Privat

Height: 5 ft. 10 ins. Chest measurement: - fully expanded 35 ins. - range of expansion 38 ins. Complexion: Fresh Eyes: Brown Hair: D. Brown Distinctive marks, and marks indicating congential peculiarities or previous disease: None

Krijgsmacht
49th Infantry Battalion Edmonton
vanaf juni 1916 tot 17 maart 1919 (Leeftijd 25 jaar)
Instantie: 7th Infantry Brigade - 3rd Canadian Division
Tekst:

3rd Division By the end of December 1915, Major-General Mercer, a Canadian by birth, commanded the Corps' 3rd Division. He held this command until his death during the Battle of Mount Sorrel, June 1916. By the end of 1916, all staff appointments in this Division, but for three, were held by Canadians.

Brigades of the 3rd Division - 7th Brigade consisted of the Princess Patricia's Light Infantry (the only unit with active field experience), the Royal Canadian Regiment (Canada's only permanent force battalion newly arrived in France after garrison duty in Bermuda), the 42nd Battalion (Montreal) and the 49th Battalion (Edmonton).

  • 8th Brigade was made up of the Canadian Mounted Rifle Battalion's 1st, 2nd, 4th and 5th Battalions.

  • 9th Brigade, which joined the Division in February 1916, comprised the 43rd (Winnipeg), 52nd (Port Arthur), 58th (Niagara area) and the 60th (Montreal) Battalions. By the end of January 1916, there were 50,000 Canadian troops in the field, serving in the Canadian Corps, as part of the British 2nd Army.

War Diary of the 3rd Canadian Division: 02.06.1916 - 13.06.1916 Location: Ypres, Belgium Battle of Mount Sorrel or Battle of Hill 62 In an effort to pull British resources from the observed build-up in the Somme, the XIII (Royal Württemberg) Corps and the 117th Infantry Division attacked an arc of high ground positions defended by the Canadian Corps. The German forces initially captured the heights at Mount Sorrel and Tor Top before entrenching on the far slope of the ridge. Following a number attacks and counterattacks, two divisions of the Canadian Corps, supported by the 20th Light Division and Second Army siege and howitzer battery groups, recaptured the majority of their former positions.

01.07.1916 - 18.11.1916 Location: Somme, France Battle of the Somme or Somme Offensive The battle consisted of an offensive by the British and French armies against the German Army, which since invading France in August 1914 had occupied large areas of that country. One of the largest battles of the First World War, by the time fighting had petered out in late autumn 1916 more than 1.5 million casualties had been suffered by the forces involved. It is understood to have been one of the bloodiest military operations ever recorded.

09.04.1917 - 14.04.1917 Location: Nord-Pas-de-Calais region, France Battle of Vimy Ridge The main combatants were the Canadian Corps against three divisions of the German Sixth Army. The battle, was part of the opening phase of the British-led Battle of Arras, a diversionary attack for the French Nivelle Offensive. The objective of the Canadian Corps was to take control of the German-held high ground along an escarpment at the northernmost end of the Arras Offensive. This would ensure that the southern flank could advance without suffering German enfilade fire. Supported by a creeping barrage, the Canadian Corps captured most of the ridge during the first day of the attack. The town of Thélus fell during the second day of the attack, as did the crest of the ridge once the Canadian Corps overcame a salient of considerable German resistance. The final objective, a fortified knoll located outside the town of Givenchy-en-Gohelle, fell to the Canadian Corps on 12 April. The German forces then retreated to the Oppy–Méricourt line.

03.05.1917 - 04.05.1917 Location: Arras and Arleux, France Third Battle of The Scarpe After securing the area around Arleux at the end of April, the British determined to launch another attack east from Monchy to try and breakthrough the Boiry Riegel and reach the Wotanstellung, a major German defensive fortification. This was scheduled to coincide with the Australian attack at Bullecourt in order to present the Germans with a two–pronged assault. British commanders hoped that success in this venture would force the Germans to retreat further to the east. With this objective in mind, the British launched another attack near the Scarpe on 3 May. However, neither prong was able to make any significant advances and the attack was called off the following day after incurring heavy casualties. Although this battle was a failure, the British learned important lessons about the need for close liaison between tanks, infantry, and artillery, which they would later apply in the Battle of Cambrai (1917).

15.08.1917 - 25.08.1917 Location: Lens and Nord-Pas-de-Calais region, France Battle of Hill 70 The primary objective of the assault was to inflict casualties and draw German troops away from the 3rd Battle of Ypres, rather than to capture territory. To achieve this objective, The Canadian Corps executed a limited operation to quickly occupy the high ground at Hill 70, established defensive positions and utilized combined small arms and artillery fire to repel German counterattacks and inflict as many casualties as possible. A later attempt by the Canadian Corps to extend its position into the city of Lens itself failed. The Canadians and the Germans both suffered high casualty rates, and Lens remained under German control. The battle consisted of extensive use of poison gas by both sides, including the newly introduced German Yellow Cross shell containing the blistering agent sulfur mustard. Ultimately, the goals of the Canadian Corps were only partially accomplished. The Canadians were successful in preventing German formations from transferring local men and equipment to aid in defensive operations in the Ypres Salient but failed to draw in troops from other areas.

26.10.1917 - 10.11.1917 Location: Ypres, Belgium Second Battle of the Passchendaele The assault position was directly south of the inter-army boundary between the British Fifth Army and Second Army. As a result the Canadian Corps was to attack with support of formations from the British Fifth Army to the north and I Anzac Corps to the south. The offensive was executed in series of attacks each with limited objectives, delivered at intervals of three or more days. The execution dates of the phases were tentatively given as 26 October, 30 October and 6 November with a final smaller action on 10 November. To permit time to facilitate inter-divisional reliefs, there was a planned seven day pause between the second and third stage during which time British Second Army was ordered to take over the section of the British Fifth Army front adjoining the Canadian Corps, so that the central portion of the assault could proceed under a single command. The attack was successful in capturing the German-held high ground along the Passchendaele-Westrozebeke ridge but the campaign was forced to end just short of Westrozebeke itself. No further attempt was made to build on the momentum of the attack. The significant victory of the Austro-German forces against the Italian Army at the Battle of Caporetto and the upcoming Battle of Cambrai ultimately forced the British to divert resources away from the sector and end all offensive actions in the Ypres Salient.

08.08.1918 - 11.08.1918 Location: Amiens, France Battle of Amiens or The Battle of Picardy The battle began in dense fog at 4:20 a.m. on 8 August 1918. Under Rawlinson's Fourth Army, the British III Corps attacked north of the Somme, the Australian Corps to the south of the river in the centre of Fourth Army's front, and the Canadian Corps to the south of the Australians. The French 1st Army under General Debeney opened its preliminary bombardment at the same time, and began its advance 45 minutes later, supported by a battalion of 72 Whippet tanks. Although German forces were on the alert, this was largely in anticipation of possible retaliation for their incursion on the 6th and not because they had learned of the preplanned Allied attack. Although the two forces were within 500 yards (460 m) of one another, gas bombardment was very low, as the bulk of the Allied presence was unknown to the Germans. The attack was so unexpected that German forces only began to return fire after five minutes, and even then at the positions where the Allied forces had assembled at the start of the battle and had long since left. In the first phase, seven divisions attacked: the British 18th (Eastern) and 58th (2/1st London), the Australian 2nd and 3rd, and the Canadian 1st, 2nd and 3rd. The Canadian and Australian attackers were supported by eight battalions of the Royal Tank Corps, with a paper strength of 216 Mark V and 72 Mark V* tanks, with 48 unarmed tanks used as supply-carrying tractors. Parts of the American 33rd Division supported the British attackers north of the Somme. The attackers captured the first German position, advancing about 4,000 yards (3,700 m) by about 7:30 a.m. In the centre, supporting units following the leading divisions attacked the second objective a further two miles (3 km) distant. Australian units reached their first objectives by 7:10 a.m., and by 8:20 a.m., the Australian 4th and 5th and the Canadian 4th divisions passed through the initial hole in the German line. The third phase of the attack was assigned to infantry-carrying Mark V* tanks. However, the infantry was able to carry out this final step unaided. The Allies penetrated well to the rear of the German defences and cavalry now continued the advance, one brigade in the Australian sector and two cavalry divisions in the Canadian sector. RAF and armoured car fire kept the retreating Germans from rallying. The Canadian and Australian forces in the center advanced quickly, pushing the line 3 miles (4.8 km) forward from its starting point by 11:00 a.m. The speed of their advance was such that a party of German officers and some divisional staff that were eating breakfast were captured. A gap 15 miles (24 km) long was punched in the German line south of the Somme by the end of the day. There was less success north of the river, where the British III Corps had only a single tank battalion in support, the terrain was rougher and the German incursion of 6 August had disrupted some of the preparations. Although the attackers gained their first objectives, they were held up short of the Chipilly spur, a steep wooded ridge. The British Fourth Army took 13,000 prisoners while the French captured a further 3,000. Total German losses were estimated to be 30,000 on 8 August. The Fourth Army's casualties, British, Australian and Canadian infantry, were approximately 8,800, exclusive of tank and air losses and their French allies. German Army Chief of Staff Paul von Hindenburg noted the Allies' use of surprise and that Allied destruction of German lines of communication had hampered potential German counter-attacks by isolating command positions. The German general Erich Ludendorff described the first day of Amiens as the "Schwarzer Tag des deutschen Heeres" ("the black day of the German Army"), not because of the ground lost to the advancing Allies, but because the morale of the German troops had sunk to the point where large numbers of troops began to capitulate. Five German divisions had effectively been engulfed. Allied forces pushed, on average, 7 miles (11 km) into enemy territory by the end of the day. The Canadians gained 8 miles (13 km), Australians 7 miles (11 km), British 2 miles (3.2 km), and the French 5 miles (8.0 km).

26.08.1918 - 30.08.1918 Location: Arras and Monchy-le-Preux, France Fifth Battle of The Scarpe H-hour: August 26, 3:00 a.m. The 2nd Division was on the right, south of the Cambrai Road; the 3rd Division, between the road and the Scarpe; the 51st Highland Division, on the left, north of the Scarpe. Supported by a powerful artillery and machine gun barrage, the attack made good progress. The 3rd Division captured Monchy, the first objective, with a skilfully executed encircling manoeuvre that was praised long after the tactical feat. On the right, the 2nd Division captured the villages of Guemappe and Wancourt during the afternoon. By nightfall, the Canadian line extended about 914 metres east of Monchy. General Currie's orders for the 27th were to break through the Fresnes-Rouvroy Line and thereby advance by eight kilometres. It took two more days of bitter fighting before this defence system near Boiry-Notre-Dame was penetrated, and when the Battle of the Scarpe ended on August 30, resolute German garrisons were still stubbornly clinging to it. In the first three days of the battle, the 2nd and 3rd Divisions had advanced more than eight kilometres over rough, broken land furrowed with extremely well-fortified trenches. Nevertheless, the Canadians succeeded in reaching the great majority of their objectives and captured 3,300 prisoners and a large number of guns.

27.09.1918 - 11.10.1918 Location: Canal du Nord & Cambrai, France Battle of Cambrai The Canadian Corps, under General Sir Arthur Currie, was put in charge of operations conceived as a set-piece attack. Because of the extremely narrow divide, at zero hour on September 27, the battlefront presented only two brigades on the left and one on the right, with a creeping artillery barrage and sappers following over hastily-built bridges, pontoons and cork slabs baled with wire netting. One artillery subsection supported each divisional artillery section behind the front line. Once across the canal, troops would reassemble and the front had to be widened at lightning speed from 2,600 metres to 15,000 metres in order to circle Bourlon Wood, capture the Blue Line and prepare to press forward toward Cambrai. In 12 hours of fighting, the Canadians covered approximately 8,500 metres of ground with the 4th Division's 38th, 87th and 102nd Battalions arriving first and the 1st Division's 1st and 13th Battalions following with greater difficulty. In the following four days of difficult fighting, both divisions, along with reinforcements from the 3rd Division, managed to secure only a limited amount of territory and by October 1, exhausted troops were ordered to rest and reassemble. Operations to capture Cambrai and secure ground northeast of the city resumed on October 8, mainly involving in the 2nd and 3rd Divisions and lasting a total of four days. 5:20 a.m. (zero hour) on September 27. An artillery barrage explodes over enemy positions and the 1st Division begins to move swiftly. Crossing the dry bed of the Canal-du-Nord with success as dawn breaks, the Canadians rapidly secure the Green Line. Passing through their ranks, the 4th Division gains entry into the southern part of Bourlon Village around 9:45 a.m., but not without heavy casualties. By 2:00 p.m., they pass the Blue Line and attain the objective of capturing Bourlon Wood (Blue Line). Pushing on, by the end of the afternoon, while the 15th Infantry Brigade stands firm at the Blue Line, brigades from the 1st and 4th Canadian Division, plus the British 11th Division, clear the enemy's Marcoing trench system. Victory is assured by 8:00 p.m. as the last pocket of enemy resistance is overcome.

17-03-1919 Arrival in Halifax, Nova Scotia with the Vessel Carmania from Liverpool, England (Roll: T-14794)


Second Battle of the Passchendaele (26.10.1917-10.11.1917)
Second Battle of the Passchendaele (26.10.1917-10.11.1917)

Notitie: The village of Passchendaele before and after the battle.


Historisch Feit
Spaanse Griep Epidemie
tussen 1918 en 1919 (Leeftijd 27 jaar)

Notitie: De Spaanse griep was een beruchte griep-pandemie uit de jaren 1918-1919. Deze wereldwijde epidemie eiste naar schatting 20 tot 100 miljoen levens, een aantal dat het totale dodental van de Eerste Wereldoorlog ruimschoots overtreft. Het virus dat de Spaanse griep veroorzaakte was van het type H1N1.
Geboorte van een dochter
#1
Lorna Wilhelmina Martin
14 februari 1924 (Leeftijd 33 jaar)
Geboorte van een zoon
#2
Gordon Kenneth ‘Ken’ Martin
14 oktober 1931 (Leeftijd 41 jaar)
Overlijden van vaderWilliam Robert Martin
7 juni 1934 (Leeftijd 43 jaar) Leeftijd: 76
Oorzaak: Nierontsteking (Nephritis) / Aderverkalking (Sclerose)
Details citaat: Aktenummer: 029858 / 518
Tekst:

Bron: Ontario, Canada Deaths, 1869-1934 Last saw alive: 08 June 1934

Aangever: Mrs. W.R. Martin | Tottenham, Ontario | Wife

In de akte wordt de overlijdensdatum gemeld op 8 juni 1934, op de grafsteen staat een overlijdensdatum van 7 juni 1934.

Overlijden van moederEliza Ann Duncan
23 februari 1937 (Leeftijd 46 jaar) Leeftijd: 72
Historisch Feit
Duitsland valt Polen binnen, begin Tweede Wereldoorlog
1 september 1939 (Leeftijd 48 jaar)

Notitie: Op 1 september 1939 viel nazi-Duitsland Polen binnen. De invasie begon met de Slag om Westerplatte. De Duitsers veroverden binnen vier weken het westelijk deel van Polen met een nieuwe tactiek, de Blitzkrieg oftewel bliksemoorlog.
Overleden 14 april 1940 (Leeftijd 49 jaar) Leeftijd: 49
Doodsoorzaak: Hersenbloeding
Bron: Privé
Tekst:

Hij was als arbeider werkzaam in Camp Borden en tijdens het graven van een diepe gleuf kreeg hij een steen op zijn hoofd. Na een korte tijd bewusteloos te zijn geweest melde hij zich bij de hoofd van de afdeling, en die bracht hem naar de Camp arts. Tijdens zijn verblijf daar, raakte hij in een coma en werd hij naar het ziekenhuis van Barrie gebracht. Een operatie werd uitgevoerd, maar toch overleed hij, nog steeds in coma aan een hersenbloeding.

Begraven april 1940 (Leeftijd 49 jaar)
Tekst:

Begraafplaats: Mount Teggart Cemetery

Gezin met ouders - Bekijk dit gezin
vader
moeder
Huwelijk: 26 november 1884New Tecumseth, Simcoe County, Ontario, Canada
11 maanden
oudere zus
23 maanden
oudere broer
Albert Harold Martin
Geboren: 20 september 1887 29 23Beeton, Simcoe County, Ontario, Canada
Overleden: 11 april 1973Ontario, Canada
3 jaar
hij zelf
3 jaar
jongere broer
4 jaar
jongere broer
Gezin met Wilhelmina Huiberdina ‘Mina’ Kaasjager - Bekijk dit gezin
hij zelf
echtgenote
dochter
Lorna Wilhelmina MartinLorna Wilhelmina Martin
Geboren: 14 februari 1924 33 36Taber, Taber, Alberta, Canada
Overleden: 12 juni 1965Toronto, Ontario, Canada
zoon
William Robert ‘Bill’ Martin
zoon
Gerrit ‘George’ Gertzen + Wilhelmina Huiberdina ‘Mina’ Kaasjager - Bekijk dit gezin
echtgenote’s echtgenoot
echtgenote
Huwelijk: 11 april 1910Philby, O'Brien County, Iowa, Verenigde Staten van Amerika
Echtscheiding: 1919Verenigde Staten van Amerika
9 maanden
stiefdochter
1 jaar
stiefzoon
George William Gertzen (1950)George William Gertzen
Geboren: 22 december 1911 41 24Taber, Taber, Alberta, Canada
Overleden: 28 april 1977Taber, Taber, Alberta, Canada

WoonplaatsCensus Canada
Tekst:

Bron: 1911 Census of Canada Simcoe South Sub-District 17

BeroepLibrary & Archives Canada
KrijgsmachtLibrary & Archives Canada
Tekst:

Regiment Number: 3206000 Unit: M.D. 13 Company No: 4 Class: I Military Service Act letter and number: 352262 MC. Rank: Privat

Height: 5 ft. 10 ins. Chest measurement: - fully expanded 35 ins. - range of expansion 38 ins. Complexion: Fresh Eyes: Brown Hair: D. Brown Distinctive marks, and marks indicating congential peculiarities or previous disease: None

KrijgsmachtLibrary & Archives Canada
Tekst:

3rd Division By the end of December 1915, Major-General Mercer, a Canadian by birth, commanded the Corps' 3rd Division. He held this command until his death during the Battle of Mount Sorrel, June 1916. By the end of 1916, all staff appointments in this Division, but for three, were held by Canadians.

Brigades of the 3rd Division - 7th Brigade consisted of the Princess Patricia's Light Infantry (the only unit with active field experience), the Royal Canadian Regiment (Canada's only permanent force battalion newly arrived in France after garrison duty in Bermuda), the 42nd Battalion (Montreal) and the 49th Battalion (Edmonton).

  • 8th Brigade was made up of the Canadian Mounted Rifle Battalion's 1st, 2nd, 4th and 5th Battalions.

  • 9th Brigade, which joined the Division in February 1916, comprised the 43rd (Winnipeg), 52nd (Port Arthur), 58th (Niagara area) and the 60th (Montreal) Battalions. By the end of January 1916, there were 50,000 Canadian troops in the field, serving in the Canadian Corps, as part of the British 2nd Army.

War Diary of the 3rd Canadian Division: 02.06.1916 - 13.06.1916 Location: Ypres, Belgium Battle of Mount Sorrel or Battle of Hill 62 In an effort to pull British resources from the observed build-up in the Somme, the XIII (Royal Württemberg) Corps and the 117th Infantry Division attacked an arc of high ground positions defended by the Canadian Corps. The German forces initially captured the heights at Mount Sorrel and Tor Top before entrenching on the far slope of the ridge. Following a number attacks and counterattacks, two divisions of the Canadian Corps, supported by the 20th Light Division and Second Army siege and howitzer battery groups, recaptured the majority of their former positions.

01.07.1916 - 18.11.1916 Location: Somme, France Battle of the Somme or Somme Offensive The battle consisted of an offensive by the British and French armies against the German Army, which since invading France in August 1914 had occupied large areas of that country. One of the largest battles of the First World War, by the time fighting had petered out in late autumn 1916 more than 1.5 million casualties had been suffered by the forces involved. It is understood to have been one of the bloodiest military operations ever recorded.

09.04.1917 - 14.04.1917 Location: Nord-Pas-de-Calais region, France Battle of Vimy Ridge The main combatants were the Canadian Corps against three divisions of the German Sixth Army. The battle, was part of the opening phase of the British-led Battle of Arras, a diversionary attack for the French Nivelle Offensive. The objective of the Canadian Corps was to take control of the German-held high ground along an escarpment at the northernmost end of the Arras Offensive. This would ensure that the southern flank could advance without suffering German enfilade fire. Supported by a creeping barrage, the Canadian Corps captured most of the ridge during the first day of the attack. The town of Thélus fell during the second day of the attack, as did the crest of the ridge once the Canadian Corps overcame a salient of considerable German resistance. The final objective, a fortified knoll located outside the town of Givenchy-en-Gohelle, fell to the Canadian Corps on 12 April. The German forces then retreated to the Oppy–Méricourt line.

03.05.1917 - 04.05.1917 Location: Arras and Arleux, France Third Battle of The Scarpe After securing the area around Arleux at the end of April, the British determined to launch another attack east from Monchy to try and breakthrough the Boiry Riegel and reach the Wotanstellung, a major German defensive fortification. This was scheduled to coincide with the Australian attack at Bullecourt in order to present the Germans with a two–pronged assault. British commanders hoped that success in this venture would force the Germans to retreat further to the east. With this objective in mind, the British launched another attack near the Scarpe on 3 May. However, neither prong was able to make any significant advances and the attack was called off the following day after incurring heavy casualties. Although this battle was a failure, the British learned important lessons about the need for close liaison between tanks, infantry, and artillery, which they would later apply in the Battle of Cambrai (1917).

15.08.1917 - 25.08.1917 Location: Lens and Nord-Pas-de-Calais region, France Battle of Hill 70 The primary objective of the assault was to inflict casualties and draw German troops away from the 3rd Battle of Ypres, rather than to capture territory. To achieve this objective, The Canadian Corps executed a limited operation to quickly occupy the high ground at Hill 70, established defensive positions and utilized combined small arms and artillery fire to repel German counterattacks and inflict as many casualties as possible. A later attempt by the Canadian Corps to extend its position into the city of Lens itself failed. The Canadians and the Germans both suffered high casualty rates, and Lens remained under German control. The battle consisted of extensive use of poison gas by both sides, including the newly introduced German Yellow Cross shell containing the blistering agent sulfur mustard. Ultimately, the goals of the Canadian Corps were only partially accomplished. The Canadians were successful in preventing German formations from transferring local men and equipment to aid in defensive operations in the Ypres Salient but failed to draw in troops from other areas.

26.10.1917 - 10.11.1917 Location: Ypres, Belgium Second Battle of the Passchendaele The assault position was directly south of the inter-army boundary between the British Fifth Army and Second Army. As a result the Canadian Corps was to attack with support of formations from the British Fifth Army to the north and I Anzac Corps to the south. The offensive was executed in series of attacks each with limited objectives, delivered at intervals of three or more days. The execution dates of the phases were tentatively given as 26 October, 30 October and 6 November with a final smaller action on 10 November. To permit time to facilitate inter-divisional reliefs, there was a planned seven day pause between the second and third stage during which time British Second Army was ordered to take over the section of the British Fifth Army front adjoining the Canadian Corps, so that the central portion of the assault could proceed under a single command. The attack was successful in capturing the German-held high ground along the Passchendaele-Westrozebeke ridge but the campaign was forced to end just short of Westrozebeke itself. No further attempt was made to build on the momentum of the attack. The significant victory of the Austro-German forces against the Italian Army at the Battle of Caporetto and the upcoming Battle of Cambrai ultimately forced the British to divert resources away from the sector and end all offensive actions in the Ypres Salient.

08.08.1918 - 11.08.1918 Location: Amiens, France Battle of Amiens or The Battle of Picardy The battle began in dense fog at 4:20 a.m. on 8 August 1918. Under Rawlinson's Fourth Army, the British III Corps attacked north of the Somme, the Australian Corps to the south of the river in the centre of Fourth Army's front, and the Canadian Corps to the south of the Australians. The French 1st Army under General Debeney opened its preliminary bombardment at the same time, and began its advance 45 minutes later, supported by a battalion of 72 Whippet tanks. Although German forces were on the alert, this was largely in anticipation of possible retaliation for their incursion on the 6th and not because they had learned of the preplanned Allied attack. Although the two forces were within 500 yards (460 m) of one another, gas bombardment was very low, as the bulk of the Allied presence was unknown to the Germans. The attack was so unexpected that German forces only began to return fire after five minutes, and even then at the positions where the Allied forces had assembled at the start of the battle and had long since left. In the first phase, seven divisions attacked: the British 18th (Eastern) and 58th (2/1st London), the Australian 2nd and 3rd, and the Canadian 1st, 2nd and 3rd. The Canadian and Australian attackers were supported by eight battalions of the Royal Tank Corps, with a paper strength of 216 Mark V and 72 Mark V* tanks, with 48 unarmed tanks used as supply-carrying tractors. Parts of the American 33rd Division supported the British attackers north of the Somme. The attackers captured the first German position, advancing about 4,000 yards (3,700 m) by about 7:30 a.m. In the centre, supporting units following the leading divisions attacked the second objective a further two miles (3 km) distant. Australian units reached their first objectives by 7:10 a.m., and by 8:20 a.m., the Australian 4th and 5th and the Canadian 4th divisions passed through the initial hole in the German line. The third phase of the attack was assigned to infantry-carrying Mark V* tanks. However, the infantry was able to carry out this final step unaided. The Allies penetrated well to the rear of the German defences and cavalry now continued the advance, one brigade in the Australian sector and two cavalry divisions in the Canadian sector. RAF and armoured car fire kept the retreating Germans from rallying. The Canadian and Australian forces in the center advanced quickly, pushing the line 3 miles (4.8 km) forward from its starting point by 11:00 a.m. The speed of their advance was such that a party of German officers and some divisional staff that were eating breakfast were captured. A gap 15 miles (24 km) long was punched in the German line south of the Somme by the end of the day. There was less success north of the river, where the British III Corps had only a single tank battalion in support, the terrain was rougher and the German incursion of 6 August had disrupted some of the preparations. Although the attackers gained their first objectives, they were held up short of the Chipilly spur, a steep wooded ridge. The British Fourth Army took 13,000 prisoners while the French captured a further 3,000. Total German losses were estimated to be 30,000 on 8 August. The Fourth Army's casualties, British, Australian and Canadian infantry, were approximately 8,800, exclusive of tank and air losses and their French allies. German Army Chief of Staff Paul von Hindenburg noted the Allies' use of surprise and that Allied destruction of German lines of communication had hampered potential German counter-attacks by isolating command positions. The German general Erich Ludendorff described the first day of Amiens as the "Schwarzer Tag des deutschen Heeres" ("the black day of the German Army"), not because of the ground lost to the advancing Allies, but because the morale of the German troops had sunk to the point where large numbers of troops began to capitulate. Five German divisions had effectively been engulfed. Allied forces pushed, on average, 7 miles (11 km) into enemy territory by the end of the day. The Canadians gained 8 miles (13 km), Australians 7 miles (11 km), British 2 miles (3.2 km), and the French 5 miles (8.0 km).

26.08.1918 - 30.08.1918 Location: Arras and Monchy-le-Preux, France Fifth Battle of The Scarpe H-hour: August 26, 3:00 a.m. The 2nd Division was on the right, south of the Cambrai Road; the 3rd Division, between the road and the Scarpe; the 51st Highland Division, on the left, north of the Scarpe. Supported by a powerful artillery and machine gun barrage, the attack made good progress. The 3rd Division captured Monchy, the first objective, with a skilfully executed encircling manoeuvre that was praised long after the tactical feat. On the right, the 2nd Division captured the villages of Guemappe and Wancourt during the afternoon. By nightfall, the Canadian line extended about 914 metres east of Monchy. General Currie's orders for the 27th were to break through the Fresnes-Rouvroy Line and thereby advance by eight kilometres. It took two more days of bitter fighting before this defence system near Boiry-Notre-Dame was penetrated, and when the Battle of the Scarpe ended on August 30, resolute German garrisons were still stubbornly clinging to it. In the first three days of the battle, the 2nd and 3rd Divisions had advanced more than eight kilometres over rough, broken land furrowed with extremely well-fortified trenches. Nevertheless, the Canadians succeeded in reaching the great majority of their objectives and captured 3,300 prisoners and a large number of guns.

27.09.1918 - 11.10.1918 Location: Canal du Nord & Cambrai, France Battle of Cambrai The Canadian Corps, under General Sir Arthur Currie, was put in charge of operations conceived as a set-piece attack. Because of the extremely narrow divide, at zero hour on September 27, the battlefront presented only two brigades on the left and one on the right, with a creeping artillery barrage and sappers following over hastily-built bridges, pontoons and cork slabs baled with wire netting. One artillery subsection supported each divisional artillery section behind the front line. Once across the canal, troops would reassemble and the front had to be widened at lightning speed from 2,600 metres to 15,000 metres in order to circle Bourlon Wood, capture the Blue Line and prepare to press forward toward Cambrai. In 12 hours of fighting, the Canadians covered approximately 8,500 metres of ground with the 4th Division's 38th, 87th and 102nd Battalions arriving first and the 1st Division's 1st and 13th Battalions following with greater difficulty. In the following four days of difficult fighting, both divisions, along with reinforcements from the 3rd Division, managed to secure only a limited amount of territory and by October 1, exhausted troops were ordered to rest and reassemble. Operations to capture Cambrai and secure ground northeast of the city resumed on October 8, mainly involving in the 2nd and 3rd Divisions and lasting a total of four days. 5:20 a.m. (zero hour) on September 27. An artillery barrage explodes over enemy positions and the 1st Division begins to move swiftly. Crossing the dry bed of the Canal-du-Nord with success as dawn breaks, the Canadians rapidly secure the Green Line. Passing through their ranks, the 4th Division gains entry into the southern part of Bourlon Village around 9:45 a.m., but not without heavy casualties. By 2:00 p.m., they pass the Blue Line and attain the objective of capturing Bourlon Wood (Blue Line). Pushing on, by the end of the afternoon, while the 15th Infantry Brigade stands firm at the Blue Line, brigades from the 1st and 4th Canadian Division, plus the British 11th Division, clear the enemy's Marcoing trench system. Victory is assured by 8:00 p.m. as the last pocket of enemy resistance is overcome.

17-03-1919 Arrival in Halifax, Nova Scotia with the Vessel Carmania from Liverpool, England (Roll: T-14794)

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Hij was als arbeider werkzaam in Camp Borden en tijdens het graven van een diepe gleuf kreeg hij een steen op zijn hoofd. Na een korte tijd bewusteloos te zijn geweest melde hij zich bij de hoofd van de afdeling, en die bracht hem naar de Camp arts. Tijdens zijn verblijf daar, raakte hij in een coma en werd hij naar het ziekenhuis van Barrie gebracht. Een operatie werd uitgevoerd, maar toch overleed hij, nog steeds in coma aan een hersenbloeding.

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Begraafplaats: Mount Teggart Cemetery